05 Series

Overview

  • Acoustic Body

Our second entry level ukulele series does not scrimp on tone or looks. Pick up one of these little beauties and you will be surprised that the laminate mahogany top and laminate mahogany body resonates with that classic Teton ukulele sound, even for the beginner uke player.

Differences between the 003 Series and 05 Series are only cosmetic: The end of the 05 fretboard is scalloped and the soundhole features a double rosette to match the binding. The Teton 05 Series ukulele comes in four sizes: soprano, concert, tenor and baritone.

If you are looking for a serious step up from beginner ukuleles, the 20 Series may be just for you.

Specs

BODY

Body Style:
Acoustic Body
Top Wood:
Mahogany Laminate
Back & Sides:
Mahogany Laminate

NECK

Neck Finish:
Satin
Fretboard:
Rosewood

OTHER

Strings:
Aquila
MSRP – Soprano:
$99 (USD)
MSRP – Concert:
$109 (USD)
MSRP – Tenor:
$119 (USD)
MSRP – Baritone:
$139 (USD)

I went to Avalon Music in Wenatchee, WA, today because I wanted to compare ukuleles. I had been reading favorable reviews about Kala, Cordoba, Fender and, of course, Martin. I had NEVER HEARD of Teton ukuleles. I played a bunch of ukuleles, comparing tone, feel, finish, intonation, and voice. Many ukuleles sound great on chords but don’t keep the clear voice for finger picking, so I tried a LOT of ukuleles in a variety of finishes, woods, and sizes. I can tell you right here and now that the Martin ukulele was the best overall ukulele, but who can afford it? I use my ukulele to lead songs at church, strum at home, finger pick new songs, and a variety of other ways and I didn’t want to be concerned about damaging a fine Martin with rough use. I was convinced before I went into the music store that I was probably going to buy a Kala and I was planning to compare the Pacific Walnut with the Mahogany. I knew I wanted a concert size. I already have a soprano and I wanted something with more projection. I picked up the Teton TC05 just to check it out and I was pleasantly surprised by its tone, voice, feel and intonation. It compared very favorably to the Kala in exotic mahogany which was priced significantly higher. I asked Evan, the salesperson, what he knew about Teton ukuleles and he was quite informative. He mentioned that a local music teacher recommends them for a class at the community college. After playing the instrument for quite a while, I felt like there was no reason to pay more money. With the Aquila strings, the instrument sings very nicely. I like the satin finish, the rosette and the little finishing touches like the black tuning pegs and cream colored pinstripe binding. If you are shopping for a ukulele, you owe it to yourself and your wallet to try out a Teton.

-Donald Short